Iraq

iraq-big.jpgSecurity and political risks of operating in Iraq hang heavily over the countries’ healthcare and pharmaceuticals market, deterring investors.

Iraq’s healthcare infrastructure is ageing - or absent - beyond the capital of Baghdad. A key reason for this is the shortage of trained healthcare personnel out of the urbanized capital.

Adding to the concern, there are only two state-run pharmaceutical factories in Iraq, thus 90% of the medications used are imported. Nearly all medications are produced by companies not registered in Iraq and are sold without being tested for efficacy.

Supply chain issues

Iraq’s drug supply chain is hampered by imports and counterfeit drugs. The deadline set by the Ministry of Health for enforcing drug laws has been largely ignored since the ousting of Saddam Hussein in 2003. Though the laws remained in effect, the invasion and its aftermath led to a vacuum in enforcement while the newly opened borders welcomed a surge of counterfeit goods into the country.

While Iraq's oil reserves present an attractive reason to work with the country, the risks currently outweigh the rewards. However, as oil is the government's chief source of revenue, much of the money could be used to improve healthcare provision, expand universal healthcare coverage, and strengthen basic vaccination and other healthcare programmes.

In August 2013, Iraq and India signed four agreements, some of which will see the Iraqi government helping with the reconstruction and improvement of healthcare facilities. One of the agreements also states that the two countries will cooperate on pharmaceuticals.

Sources: BMI, Los Angeles Times.

  • <<
  • 1
  • >>

1 to 2 of 2 results

Iraq News

  • <<
  • 1
  • >>

1 to 2 of 2 results

Back to top